Do Election Years Affect the Stock Market? | Phil Town



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No one knows how to predict the stock market. But since it is an election year, we can predict that the market might be affected as it has been historically. That’s why today I want to discuss the correlation between election years and the economy, and what investors can learn from them. https://bit.ly/30oMPi9

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Timestamps

00:00 – Intro
00:19 – 2020 stock market
00:45 – Election years historically
01:40 – Tips for investing during an election year
02:47 – What investors can do now
03:02 – First year after an election
04:00 – Question

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Tax Time: What About Your Individual Retirement Account?

An Individual Retirement Account (IRA) is a great retirement savings tool for most individuals. Created by the federal government, IRAs can be funded during your working years. During retirement, IRAs may help supplement your Social Security benefits.

What Happened to My IRA?

If you have watched the value of your IRA diminish over the last few years, and you are wondering what happened to your IRA, you may want to seriously consider a self-directed IRA. You can convert your existing retirement accounts to self-directed accounts, easily and begin growing your accounts based on your knowledge.

Best Practices for Real Estate IRA Investing – How to Manage Your Real Estate IRA Investments

For those with a penchant for real estate investing, IRAs are a potent vehicle indeed. Outside of a tax-advantaged account, such as an IRA or a SEP IRA, rental income is taxable every year, as you receive it, and passive activity rules restrict your ability to claim losses from real estate. If you use a self-directed IRA, or a real estate IRA, however, you can accumulate all that rental income tax-deferred, or tax-free if you hold the asset in a Roth IRA.

Roth IRA Calculator: Valuable Tool to Help You Maximize Potentials of Conversion

If you have been pondering whether to convert your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, it is worth your time and effort to research and compare the pros and cons. In the web, there are an inexhaustible source of information and opinions on Roth conversions. A fascinating website such as Forbes provides relevant data to guide you as to how much you should convert even without a calculator.

UBIT – It’s a Good Thing, It Means You’re Making Money!

If there ever was a subject that will stop an accountant is his or her tracks it is UBIT, which stands for unrelated business income tax. The origins of UBIT are obscure. This tax was placed on some taxpayers to “level the playing field” for certain businesses. The best example of how UBIT is used is for the competition between a non-profit and a for-profit enterprise. The college book­store sells books to students and others within the structure of their “non-profit” umbrella. The college bookstore, because it is non-profit, is not taxed the same way as a for-profit enterprise. A non-profit does not pay taxes on most operations and there­fore can afford to sell books at a lower cost than the for-profit store across the street. Since both the college bookstore and the for-profit bookstore are competing for the same customers, the college bookstore has the advantage of being treated differ­ently for tax purposes and the advantage of this preferential tax treatment may allow the college bookstore to sell their books for less, thus attracting customers away from the for-profit store.

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